Writing Feedback


write, a photo by erichhh on Flickr.
Earlier today a teacher friend of mine asked me what I thought the single most powerful thing a school/teachers could do to impact writing. After thinking for a moment, my response was teacher feedback. Given a workshop-style classroom is already in place and students are writing daily, much of their learning growth will come from one of two times. One, during their daily (or so) writing conferences with their teacher or two, with written commentary on their writing. When I say writing, I by no means mean final papers, graded, finished, no-opportunity-for-learning writing; but rather the formative writing along the way. I often gave my students quick writes that were a paragraph or two, collected them, and gave them feedback on one or two specific items. This way, even when I had 125 students, I could get them back in a timely manner so the feedback was actually meaningful to them. In this case, the feedback was either a few quick sentences or a checklist of items that I was looking for — either present or not. My intentions were that by the time we got to a final major assessment piece of writing, the students would have mastered all the skills being assessed on that piece because through ongoing feedback, remediation, and conferencing, the skills were taught again and again as needed.
Advertisements

Feedback….

IF

 

Feedback can be one of the most powerful ways that we as teachers impact our students’ learning…if the feedback is specific. This is also where we get into public commentary on exemplar work to hang in our classrooms so that our students know what it looks like to meet or not meet a given standard. After all, what good does it do them if they don’t know what they are working to achieve? I remember in year’s past (not in any of our teaching careers, of course!) when it was a great mystery to determine how one would get a given grade on an assignment. No more are those days. Now, by setting mock models of work with the commentary on them, our students know exactly what our expectations are of them as they are learning. And just think how much more they will learn with the expectation in front of them –in black and white!

After all, what good does it do them if they don’t know what they are supposed to learn?

A Place to Reflect & Ruminate

Catina: teaching, learning, leading, creating

Talk Tech With Me

A collection of ideas and thoughts on technology in education.

Daily Shoot

If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow. John Dewey

Ditch That Textbook

Ed tech, creative teaching, less reliance on the textbook.

Connected Principals

Sharing. Learning. Leading.

Stump The Teacher

If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow. John Dewey

Posts - Learning in Hand

If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow. John Dewey

Cool Cat Teacher Blog

Be a Better Teacher. Live a Meaningful Life.

The Principal of Change

Stories of learning and leading

Miss Night's Marbles

If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow. John Dewey

WordPress.com

WordPress.com is the best place for your personal blog or business site.

%d bloggers like this: